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Here are a few simple and practical steps you can take in creating an organic-chemical culture for better cropping:

 

The idea of organic growing is an exciting one. Think about it: Billions of years of evolution have created a complex symbiotic relationship between plants and their microbes as well as between nitrogen-fixing bacteria, bacteria that colonize root masses and the antibiotic-producing bacteria that fend off an array of harmful diseases. But how do organics perform when pitted against the world of synthetics? Can an organic indoor garden provide, say, the nitrate availability of chemical fertilizers? Do chemical fertilizers, though effective in providing heavy nutrients, lack the complexity of natural systems? Or is there some sort of middle ground?

Over a year later, British Petroleum's Gulf of Mexico oil spill, the worst in US history, continues to wreak havoc. The problems are many - human health, fish stocks, lack of compensation, destroyed local business - to name a few. Meanwhile, the US congress hasn’t changed a single law concerning deep water drilling. Why, after the largest US oil spill, isn’t the American public angry about the BP disaster?

... in Environment

Extreme threats require extreme measures – especially when it comes to climate change. If it’s left unabated, we might have no other choice but to remedy increased global warming with schemes that attempt to manipulate the environment in ways that could lower Earth’s temperatures – it is called “geo-engineering.” Let’s run through some of the more popular schemes.

... in Environment

“One thing is clear: the era of easy oil is over. What we all do next will determine how well we meet the energy needs of the entire world in this century and beyond.” David J. O’Reilly, Chairman & CEO of Chevron.

... in Environment

“One thing is clear: the era of easy oil is over. What we all do next will determine how well we meet the energy needs of the entire world in this century and beyond.” – David J. O’Reilly, Chairman & CEO of Chevron.

... in Environment

“One thing is clear: the era of easy oil is over. What we all do next will determine how well we meet the energy needs of the entire world in this century and beyond.” David J. O’Reilly, Chairman & CEO of Chevron.

... in Environment

Cities are now the epicenter of corporate trade and globalized commerce. They serve as centralized hubs for industrial capitalism. And as economic globalization increasingly leaches into all corners of civilization, it becomes harder, especially if you live in the Third World, to make a viable living in rural life. We are seeing a mass of population, bewildered by the crushing fate of market globalization, migrate into urban landscapes in hope of finding work. This presents two converging problems: 1) As urbanization swells, so too will emission rates – cities are responsible for 70 percent of all emissions; 2) as global warming advances, sea levels and disaster rates will increase, posing enormous consequences to urban populations – many of which live under the sea level. This is the second in a two-part series addressing the congruent threats of climate change and growing urbanization.

... in Environment

Cities are now the epicenter of corporate trade and globalized commerce. They serve as centralized hubs for industrial capitalism. And as economic globalization increasingly leaches into all corners of civilization, it becomes harder, especially if you live in the Third World, to make a viable living in rural life. We are seeing a mass of population, bewildered by the crushing fate of market globalization, migrate into urban landscape in hope of finding work. This presents two converging problems: 1) As urbanization swells, so too will emission rates – cities are responsible for 70 percent of all emissions; 2) as global warming advances, sea levels and disaster rates will increase, posing enormous consequences to urban populations – many of which live under the sea level. This is a two-part series addressing the congruent threats of climate change and growing urbanization.

A survey issued in March 2010 by Gallup found that almost half of all Americans do not believe that humans are the cause of global warming. And this number seems to be rising – from 33 percent in 2003. The public is becoming increasingly skeptical of anthropogenic global warming (AGW) while 98 percent of climatologists say AGW is not only real, but will bear catastrophic consequences for the human species. So why is the general public so divided over climate change when only scientists are equipped to answer whether global warming is fact or fiction, truth or myth?

... in Environment

Unemployment in America, if you count those who have given up searching for work and those who need full-time work but can only find part-time employment, is not 9 percent ‒ it’s around 20 percent. The real economy, often called Main Street, has not recovered from the 2008 financial collapse. Real wages for the average American have not increased in 50 years, falling behind inflation. And while the stagnation of the real economy increases, the multinational corporations and Wall Street financial firms are reporting record profits, shelling-out billions of dollars in bonuses to CEOs and financial managers. Some have called this new configuration of wealth and power “neofeudalism.”

It is very easy to get bogged down in the stark reports of climate change. The news really is grim. But more important than investigating the consequences of environmental destruction and pollution is knowing how to best reduce your personal footprint. This is not always easy. We are dependent upon a system that demands fuel consumption. So are there personal ways to help mitigate the looming crisis?

... in Environment

As the science of climate change advances, an unavoidable reality becomes increasingly clear: we are living on the threshold of an ominous age. You only have to follow James Hansen’s reports or read Clive Hamilton’s “Requiem for a Species” to understand the gravity of our collective situation. Temperatures are increasing, ice caps are melting, and sea levels are rising at a much faster rate than predicted. This begs a critical question: Why have the sophisticated computer models been inaccurate in forecasting global climate change? Recent studies might provide us with some important answers:

... in Environment
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