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Hydro 101 with Deonna Marie: Container Size & Why It Makes a Difference

Make sure you get the right size pot for the plants in your indoor grow room. Make sure you get the right size pot for the plants in your indoor grow room.

This week we’re discussing something often overlooked by new growers - container sizes. This is a key factor in your successful grow, but many newbies stumble along the way when learning about getting your plants into the right pots. In this edition of Hydro 101, I'll tell you how to pick out the correct container size for optimal results, and also what to expect from the container size you choose.

Most indoor growers will use any old gardening pot for growing, which is fine as long as you make sure you poke holes in the bottom for proper drainage. When using potting soil, make sure there is a layer of something like Hydroton or Dyna-Rok at the bottom of the pot for drainage.

I recommend starting with a three-gallon pot in the vegetative phase, and then transplanting into at least a six-gallon pot a week before bloom.

Make sure you’re purchasing high quality soil from your local hydro store or nursery; don't just dig up any old dirt and place it in your container. If you do, you most likely will end up an unhappy grower within weeks of planting.

The size of the pot will determine how big the plant can get. Use around 1-6 gallon containers as a general rule. The smaller the pot, the smaller the plant. That’s mostly because the roots have no more room to grow once they have reached their limit in the container.

I recommend starting with a three-gallon pot in the vegetative phase, and then transplanting into at least a six-gallon pot a week before bloom. This way you ensure that the roots have a fresh start and plenty of room to grow during the bloom cycle. You can go even bigger, say to a ten-gallon pot depending on your room size. Just remember, the bigger the pot, the bigger the plant.

After choosing the right container for your growing area, make sure to space each container about a foot apart to ensure there will be no overcrowding. Many growers make the mistake of placing their young plants right next to each other, and then as the plants get bigger, they don’t get optimum light, which leads to smaller yields. I hope this answers some of your questions about picking out containers for your grow. Until next time hydro heads, Grow Big Or Go Home!!! Xoxoxo

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Last modified on Tuesday, 03 July 2012 17:32

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