Hide this

header-hydro

Hydro 101 with Deonna Marie: Set Up the Right Lighting

Make sure you set up your grow lighting just right for your size of indoor grow room. Make sure you set up your grow lighting just right for your size of indoor grow room.

We’ve covered a lot of ground in Hydro 101 to this point, and if you’ve been following along, you will be ready to take some serious steps in getting your first grow up and running. We’ve spoken a lot about outdoor growing lately, but this week, we’re turning our attention back to the indoor grow room.

A lot of newbie’s have trouble determining the correct amount of light for the grow space they have. Setting up your first grow room is a bit of a puzzle, and you’ll make adjustments as your growing skills progress. But with these tips, you should be able to get things pretty much right straight out of the gate.

Before you begin setting up your grow room, you need to decide how many lights you will need. I’ve developed the following guidelines that should let you hit the ground running: 

  • A 1000W set-up covers a 6x6 area really well. In this area, you can grow six to nine plants in 3-gallon to 5-gallon containers.
  • A 600W covers a 5x5 area and five to six plants in 3-gallon to 5-gallon containers.
  • A 400W covers a 4x4 area and about five plants in 2-gallon Containers.
  • A 250W covers a 3x3 area and about four plants in 1-gallon or 2-gallon containers.

Generally speaking, the higher the wattage the more yield you will have in the end. But remember, you can’t just crank up your lights - the higher the wattage the more heat will be created. In some cases ,you may need to go with a 600 or 400 watt system if you can't afford to cool a 1000W system properly. Trust me, heat is not a problem you want to run into.

But remember, you can’t just crank up your lights - the higher the wattage the more heat will be created.

If your room is too hot, the quality and yield of your final product will be greatly reduced. You want to try to keep the temperature of the growing area in the low 70s for optimal growth.

Heat will also cause plants to stretch instead of staying nice and bushy. Since the light creates heat, keep the light two to three feet away from the canopy. If your light is too close to the canopy, it may actually burn your plants. The best way to figure out how close you can lower your light is to put your hand right on top of the canopy and if the back of your hand is warm or hot from the light, it's too close. Move your reflector higher until the back of your hand is no longer warm.  

These guidelines cover the basics of setting up your first indoor grow room. As you get more accustomed to the growing process, you can check out some of Rosebud Magazine’s more advanced lighting techniques. But for now, the information provided here should allow you to set up your room with adequate light for your growing area.

Follow Us:

Need to learn about growing phases? Deonna Marie has the info you need here.

Need tips for building your indoor grow room? We’ve got you covered.

What new albums are rocking in the Rosebud Magazine offices this week? Check it out here.

Follow Rosebud Magazine on Twitter – click here.

© Copyright RosebudMag.com, 2011



To create link towards this article on your website,
copy and paste the text below in your page.




Preview :


Powered by Rosebudmag © 2018
Follow Rosebud Magazine on Twitter Check out the Rosebud Magazine Facebook
Share this article with your friends, family and co-workers
High wattage lighting and Deonna Marie have one thing in common – they’re both hot!
Last modified on Monday, 08 October 2012 19:29

Want To Grow Bigger?

 

Twitter-Button

Follow growers on Twitter

 

FacebookButtonJoin grower discussions on Facebook

 

email-icon-1Ask our expert growers questions at: experts@rosebudmag.com

Growers Underground
QuickCure
© Rosebud Magazine, 2010 - 2018 | All rights reserved.

Login or Register

LOG IN