Hide this

header-hydro-pop

BioFuels: The Oil Extractor Challenges

One of the problems with biofuel is figuring out efficient extraction methods. One of the problems with biofuel is figuring out efficient extraction methods.

 

One Hydroponic Company Is Already Contemplating The Future OF Biofuel Courtesy of David at Tamisium Extractors (tamisiumextractors.com)

The current problem with biofuel production in regards to using oils from plants, aside from the issues of land acquisition, is the cost of removing the valuable fuel from the plant. This cost-to-gain ratio is the thorn in the side of every alternative fuel process.

When discussing biofuel specifically, cost can be dramatic. Some of the industry standards require high pressure or intense heat, or both. Other costs include that of the apparatus used to extract the fuels or oils from the plant, the solvent required for the process, and the labor required to run the machines and recover that solvent if applicable.

When dissolving the oils you must first put the oil into a soluble form by using the correct solvent, high heat, and/or pressure. Then you must wash the oils free from the plant, essentially filtering out the plant from the dissolved or melted oils. This is where the oil extraction process really happens.

In addition to reducing the cost of the material, a further reduction in cost can come from building larger machines that can reduce the time, labor and wattage associated with construction and extraction.

The second phase of oil extraction is removing the solvent from the oils. This is where a large portion of the cost comes from. Cost efficiency during the extraction and solvent removal phase can be an even greater factor if heat and pressure are required to maximize efficiency. The more heat and pressure required, the more costly the process becomes.

A maximally efficient machine that utilizes an easy-to-remove solvent and requires minimal heat and pressure not only allows more cost-efficient processing of some plant materials but also opens the door for processing plants that would otherwise not even be considered because they were cost-prohibitive.

Tamisium Extractors are currently the highest-yielding, most efficient process developed for oil extraction from plants, but the drawback is still the cost of the machine itself.

When used in the medical and food industries, as they are now, Tamisium Extractors are built with stainless steel using low tolerances and costly techniques. However, when used in the fuel industry, the cost can be greatly reduced by building machines out of less costly materials like steel and utilizing less precise construction methods.

In addition to reducing the cost of the material, a further reduction in cost can come from building larger machines that can reduce the time, labor and wattage associated with construction and extraction. This can add up to millions of dollars in savings when undertaken.

Upscaling some processes is not an option when high pressure or heat are required, but with a Tamisium Extractor, upscaling is totally possible. This is due to the low pressures and temperatures required thanks to the very efficient butane solvent the machine uses.

Is flammability a factor? Flammability is a moot point as well because safety requirements when dealing with fuel-related compounds would be redundant. The pros of using this process for extracting biofuel are so great that it seems as if Tamisium was created specifically for this purpose.

The disadvantages are the same as they are in any new process. Once a more efficient technology comes into play, the whole gamut of previous research must be discarded and completely redone. This is the largest hurdle a new company has when introducing a better technology.

On the other hand, you can also expect to discard all your cost analysis and replace it with much more favorable numbers across the board. That goes for profit and production as well as greatly reduced costs.

© Copyright RosebudMag.com, 2013



To create link towards this article on your website,
copy and paste the text below in your page.




Preview :


Powered by Rosebudmag © 2019
Follow Rosebud Magazine on Twitter Check out the Rosebud Magazine Facebook
Share this article with your friends, family and co-workers
Algae can make biofuel.
Last modified on Wednesday, 08 May 2013 08:25

Want To Grow Bigger?

 

Twitter-Button

Follow growers on Twitter

 

FacebookButtonJoin grower discussions on Facebook

 

email-icon-1Ask our expert growers questions at: experts@rosebudmag.com

Growers Underground
QuickCure
© Rosebud Magazine, 2010 - 2018 | All rights reserved.

Login or Register

LOG IN